British School at Athens Library catalogue loaded

We’re pleased to announce that the holdings of the British School at Athens (BSA Library website) have been added to Copac.

British School at Athens Library.

British School at Athens Library. Copyright: BSA.

The British School at Athens is the United Kingdom’s hub for advanced research in the humanities and social sciences in Greece and its wider Balkan, Levantine, Mediterranean, and European contexts. The Library is at the heart of the BSA’s work in Athens, providing researchers with 24 hour access to a collection of more than 60,000 monographs, 1,300 periodical titles and a growing collection of electronic resources.

The collection covers all aspects of Hellenic Studies, with particular emphasis on:

• Art and archaeology of the Greek world
• Archaeology from the Balkans and Black Sea
• Archaeological Theory and Material Sciences
• Epigraphy
• Byzantine art and architecture
• Travellers to Greece
• A Rare Book collection based on the library of George Finlay

To browse, or limit your search to the British School at Athens Library, go to the main tab on copac.jisc.ac.uk and choose ‘British School at Athens’ from the list of libraries. Copac is a free service accessible at: http://copac.jisc.ac.uk.

 

The National Bibliographic Knowledgebase

We’re pleased to announce the development of a National Bibliographic Knowledgebase (NBK). This will be a three year development that builds on the long term success of the Copac service. The NBK will provide a new platform for expanding the database to include all UK Higher Education libraries that wish to participate, as well as retaining and increasing the range of non-academic research libraries. This greater inclusiveness of HE (and other) libraries has been the most frequent enhancement request from Copac users and we will now be working towards that goal. Jisc has commissioned OCLC to create the NBK and we will be working with the Higher Education library community to bring on board many more HE libraries, as well as continuing to expand the range of specialist research libraries that contribute their catalogue.

In the short term the NBK will be developed in parallel with the continuing development of Copac and we aim to move all current contributor data onto the new platform. As the NBK becomes established it is anticipated that Copac services, including Copac Collection Management tools (CCM tools), will become integrated into the NBK, to offer functionality that utilises the expanded data set that the NBK will provide. We will be looking to enhance existing services in resource discovery and collection management, as well as developing new services to support libraries in the management of their print and digital resources.

Full details of the NBK are available on the Press release on the Jisc National Monograph Solutions (NMS) blog.

We have also added information about the NBK to the Copac FAQ pages.

This is very early days for the project. The Copac team will be working with current Copac contributors over coming months as we begin to develop the new NBK. We will also talking with library consortia, as well as individual institutions, as we look at widening the range of contributing institutions.

University of Reading Library catalogue loaded

We’re pleased to announce that the holdings of the University of Reading (http://www.reading.ac.uk/library) have been added to Copac.

Image copyright: University of Reading

Image copyright: University of Reading

The Library is located at the centre of Whiteknights campus and contains over a million items across a variety of subject areas, with a range of collections of specific types of material:

* Artworks in the Library
* Course Collection (items in demand and on reading lists)
* European Documentation Centre
* Government publications
* Journals
* Legislation
* Maps, atlases and gazetteers
* Music
* Parliamentary publications
* Teaching Practice Collection
* Theses

The Library’s Special Collections Services are housed separately, in the same building as the Museum of English Rural Life (MERL). Collections include rare books, archives and manuscripts, and the MERL library and archives.

To browse, or limit your search to University of Reading , go to the main tab on copac.jisc.ac.uk and choose ‘Reading University’ from the list of libraries. Copac is a free service accessible at: http://copac.jisc.ac.uk.

Durham Cathedral’s Treasures

 Durham Cathedral MSS A.I.3 – St Cuthbert ©Chapter of Durham Cathedral


Durham Cathedral MSS A.I.3 – St Cuthbert ©Chapter of Durham Cathedral

Durham Cathedral’s Library can be traced back to the community of St Cuthbert originating in the 7th century at Lindisfarne. After fleeing Holy Island after Viking invasion, they settled in Durham in 995 bringing with them, alongside the body of Cuthbert and his sacred relics, their most precious manuscripts and scholarly works. In 1093, the Normans settled in Durham, establishing a Benedictine Community of Monks, and after the dissolution of the priory in 1539, the cathedral was re-founded under a dean and chapter who inherited much of what survived of the priory’s collection of manuscripts and printed books.

Durham Cathedral maintains the most complete in-situ medieval monastic library in Britain, built around these 308 surviving manuscripts and volumes, and also retains a collection of over 30,000 early printed books dating from the 16th to the 19th century. It also holds a manuscript music collection mostly comprising part-books used by the cathedral choir from the 17th to the 19th century, and printed secular and instrumental music. The post-1851 Chapter collection specialises in church history, local history, bibliography and architecture. We also maintain a modern theological lending library of around 15,000 titles on behalf of the Lord Crewe Trust.

The Cathedral also retains a substantial Archive, one of the most complete and extensive monastic archives to survive in Britain in its original location. Our colleagues at Durham University Library manage the Archives on our behalf. Among the many treasures held in the Archives, the Cathedral remains unique in holding three engrossments of the Magna Carta, alongside their corresponding Charters of the Forest – from 1216, 1225 and 1300.

King John Seal, Magna Carta, 1300 (DCL 2.2.Reg.2 ) ©Chapter of Durham Cathedral

King John Seal, Magna Carta, 1300 (DCL 2.2.Reg.2 ) ©Chapter of Durham Cathedral

The library is perhaps somewhat unique in that it retains responsibility not only for the paper and parchment collections owned by the Cathedral, but for all of its objects too. We care for tens of thousands of artefacts of historical, cultural, and religious significance including paintings, carved stones, textiles, metalwork, and even whale bones. The collections date as far back as the Anglo-Saxon period, and include the holy relics of St Cuthbert.

My role as Head of Collections is a busy one, overseeing the management of two Reading Rooms in order to facilitate access to the library collections (modern and historic), and since July, also having oversight of the Cathedral’s Open Treasure exhibition spaces. The claustral spaces have been opened to the public to host an interactive display showcasing the history of the Cathedral, the life of St Cuthbert and the many facets of life in a monastic community. We have also developed new exhibition galleries which will allow us to display many of the Cathedral’s treasured manuscripts and artefacts in environmentally controlled conditions. It’s an exciting opportunity to not only permanently display the relics of St Cuthbert in a beautiful environment which will help protect the objects, but also to be able to manage an ever-changing exhibition programme to allow people to see the wide range of objects held by the Cathedral. More information can be found here: https://www.durhamcathedral.co.uk/open-treasure.

Open Treasure, Monks’ Dormitory ©Peter Burmann

Open Treasure, Monks’ Dormitory ©Peter Burmann

To support Open Treasure, and to complement the exhibitions, new outreach programmes have been developed. The library plays a lead role through hosting visits from reading groups, displaying volumes from the collections which will hopefully inspire further learning and interest.

We will also contribute to the Education team’s Young Curator’s group. Targeting 11-15 year olds, the programme will teach children all about the art of creating an exhibition, to mirror those the Cathedral are creating.

The collections have traditionally been made available in a broader sense in a variety of ways.

Refectory Library ©Peter Burmann

Refectory Library ©Peter Burmann

Library staff undertake numerous displays and tours for all sorts of groups and to the public on a dizzying array of subjects – catering for coach parties, architecture and medieval manuscript students, specialist academics attending study days during Holy Week, potential donors, and on open days to the public.

Our visitors appreciate the opportunity to see material which is usually locked away and out of sight   – it can inspire that desire to learn more and widen access to the collections in the most positive of ways, adding an extra understanding to people’s concepts about the Cathedral and its wider role.

While Open Treasure will keep us even busier, we welcome the opportunity to showcase our collections in a beautiful and environmentally stable location. If you ever find yourself in Durham, please let us know. We would be delighted to show you around.

Lisa Di Tommaso
Head of Collections

All images copyright the Chapter of Durham Cathedral and Peter Burmann and reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright holders.

Jisc workshops in November: making your digital collections easier to discover

Jisc is offering two one-day workshops to help you increase the reach of your digital collections, optimise them for discovery and evaluate their impact.

 

Exploiting digital collections in learning, teaching and research will be held on Tuesday 15 November.

Making Google work for your digital collections will be held on Tuesday 22 November.

 

If your organisation has digital collections, or plans to develop them, our workshops will help you maximize the reach of those collections online, demonstrate the impact of their usage, and help you build for future sustainability. They will equip you with the knowledge and skills to:

• Increase the visibility of your digital collections for use in learning, teaching and research
• Encourage collaboration between curators and users of digital collections
• Strategically promote your digital collections in appropriate contexts, for a range of audiences
• Optimise your collection for discovery via Google and other search tools
• Use web analytics to track and monitor access and usage of your digital collections
• Evaluate impact and realise the benefits of investment in your digital collection

Who should attend?

Anyone working in education and research, who manages, supports and/or promotes digital collections for teaching, learning and research. Those working in similar roles in libraries, archives and museums would also benefit.

Both workshops will be held at Jisc office, Brettenham House, London and will offer a mix of discussion, practical activities and post-workshop resources to support online resource discovery activities.

For more information and to book your place please visit www.jisc.ac.uk/advice/training/making-your-digital-collections-easier-to-discover

Jisc resource discovery workshops – flyer

Royal College of Nursing Library catalogue loaded

We’re pleased to announce that the holdings of the Royal College of Nursing Library have been added to Copac.

Photo of Royal College of Nursing Library

Royal College of Nursing Library. Image copyright: Royal College of Nursing, London

The Royal College of Nursing Library and Archive Service is Europe’s largest nursing resource, with a wealth of print and e-resources.

The Collection dates mainly from the 1850s onwards. We strive to remain the pre-eminent specialist nursing collection of English language materials in Europe: collecting books, journals, nursing PhD theses, pamphlets, rare grey literature, audio-visual, digital objects, oral histories, images and archives through to the most recent e-books, e-journals and e-resources.

The Royal College of Nursing is a professional UK membership body and union of over 400,000 registered nurses, midwives, health care assistants and nursing students.

The Library and Archive Service supports our members, who work in a range of health care specialties and settings in the NHS and independent sectors. Around 35,000 nursing students are members.

To browse, or limit your search to the Royal College of Nursing Library, go to the main tab on copac.jisc.ac.uk and choose ‘Royal College of Nursing Library’ from the list of libraries.

 

The Library of the Zoological Society of London

A couple of months ago I was asked by Copac to write a piece about the Library that I work in, and I was only too happy to oblige as I can proudly say I work in a very special library, which I’d love to tell you more about…

My name is Emma, and I’m the Deputy Librarian at the Library of the Zoological Society of London.  We’re situated just on the edge of Regent’s Park, next to London Zoo, and we are one of the largest (and oldest) zoological libraries in the world!  We have in the region of 200,000 items on our shelves, comprising of about 40,000 books, 5000 journal titles, along with art works and archives, all of which are related to the study of zoology.  We also have nearly 20,000 unique records on Copac, demonstrating how unusual some of the items in our collection are.

Photo of ZSL Library interior

ZSL Library interior

You may have noticed that I tend to stress that the Library is part of the Zoological Society of London, and that’s because ZSL is made up of many departments working together on a range of projects, across the globe.  ZSL is comprised of not only London Zoo, but also Whipsnade Zoo, and very importantly the huge team of scientists and conservationists that make up two departments called the Institute of Zoology and Conservation Programmes.   The Library has the challenging task of trying to support the needs of the staff in all of these areas (many of whom are overseas) ranging from ordering books about the naked mole rat for Keeper staff here in London, to helping with literature searching about the red panda for our colleagues out in Nepal!  The Library is also open to members of the public, with the hope that we might inspire an enthusiasm for the conservation of animals.

Also, people are often surprised to find out that the Zoological Society of London has a rich history – a history that the Library has been intertwined with from ZSL’s founding in 1826.  In 1826, an ambitious man named Sir Stamford Raffles founded ZSL to meet the needs of the growing zoological community.  One of the obvious aims was to create a living collection of animals, but another very important goal was to create a leading zoological library.  In the early days the library had various locations across London, including Leicester Square and Hannover Square, but by 1910 it was decided that the library should be closer to the living animal collection in Regent’s Park, and from that day on is where the Library has remained.

To give an idea of the kind of material ZSL Library holds, we wanted to share with you some of the highlights of the collection, but it has been proving very difficult to select just a few as there are so many to choose from!  So I hope you don’t mind that I’ve selected a few that are my personal favourites, and hopefully you can see why.

Historiae animalium / by Konrad Gessner (1516-1565). – Tiguri : Froschover, 1551-85

Konrad Gessner was a Swiss naturalist, who was trying to describe all of the animals that were known (and unknown) at the time, and his 5 book work, Historiae animalium, is the culmination of his efforts.  In these books can be found descriptions of mammals, birds, fish and reptiles – some accurate, but some curious, like this ‘giraffe’ below.  This is also one of our oldest books in the Library.

‘Giraffe’ picture - Historiae animalium

‘Giraffe’ picture – Historiae animalium by Konrad Gessner (1516-1565).

Daily Occurrences

The Library also contains a unique archival collection relating to the history of ZSL, and one of our more heavily consulted items is a series of volumes called Daily Occurrences.  They record the comings and goings of animals at both London and Whipsnade Zoos, from both of the zoos foundation to the present day (admittedly the current ones are electronic).  This particular page shows the arrival of one of the stars London Zoo – Jumbo the Elephant.

Photo of Daily Occurrences – 26th June 1865

Daily Occurrences – 26th June 1865

Illustrations of the family of Psittacidae, or parrots, the greater part of them species hitherto unfigured… / by Edward Lear (1812-1888). – London : Lear, 1832

Edward Lear is most commonly known for his ‘nonsense poetry’ (i.e. the Owl and the Pussycat), but Lear was also a phenomenally talented artist whose skill influenced the style of others, such as the ornithologist John Gould and his wife Elizabeth.  One of Lear’s most beautiful works is his volume on the family of parrots, of which the illustrations were based on the birds in ZSL’s parrot house.

Image of Parrot from Illustrations of the family of Psittacidae

Illustrations of the family of Psittacidae, or parrots, the greater part of them species hitherto unfigured… / by Edward Lear (1812-1888). – London : Lear, 1832.

ZSL Library welcomes  members of the public, as well as Staff and Fellows of the ZSL.  As well as being able to make use of our resources, we usually have something of interest on display and there are always paintings and sculptures to admire in the Reading Room. To find out more please email library@zsl.org or consult our web pages http://www.zsl.org/about-us/zsl-library-collection.  Don’t forget to follow on Twitter @ZSLArts

Emma Milnes
Assistant Librarian
The Library
The Zoological Society of London

All images copyright the Zoological Society of London and reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright holder.

 

Royal Holloway, University of London Library catalogue loaded

We’re pleased to announce that the holdings of the Royal Holloway, University of London Library have been added to Copac.

Photograph of the Library at Royal Holloway, University of London

Founder’s Library at Royal Holloway, University of London. Image copyright: Royal Holloway, University of London.

Royal Holloway College, originally a women-only college, was founded by the Victorian entrepreneur, Thomas Holloway in 1879. The campus is set in 135 acres of woodland near Windsor, and is acknowledged as one of the country’s most appealing campuses, offering a close-knit community based location with close proximity to London.

Royal Holloway Library Services occupies two sites on campus – the Bedford Library, opened by The Princess Royal in 1993, houses resources for Science, Social Sciences and History, while the Founder’s Library, located within the magnificent Founder’s Building, modelled on the Chateau de Chambord and opened by Queen Victoria in 1886, houses Languages, Literatures, Cinema, Theatre, Fine Arts and Music. Currently under construction is a new Library and Student Services building due to open in 2017. This will dramatically expand our library and study space, provide flexible learning and public spaces and a dedicated study area for PhD students. It will also provide a purpose-built storage space for Royal Holloway’s art and archives, as well as the Library’s Special Collections.

The Library’s book collections extend to some 600,000 volumes. There are subscriptions to more than 17,000 e-journals; more than 800,000 items are loaned each year and there is an annual footfall of about 700,000.

To browse, or limit your search to the Royal Holloway, University of London Library, go to the main tab on copac.jisc.ac.uk and choose ‘Royal Holloway, University of London Library’ from the list of libraries.

National Aerospace Library catalogue loaded

We’re pleased to announce that the holdings of the National Aerospace Library have been added to Copac.

National Aerospace Library

National Aerospace Library. Image copyright: National Aerospace Library

The National Aerospace Library (NAL) in Farnborough is one of the most prestigious aerospace and aeronautical library collections in the world. Collections contain contemporary and historical material exploring man’s dream to conquer flight including:

  • Aircraft engineering
  • Military flight, including twentieth century warfare
  • Civil aviation
  • General works on aircraft, ballooning and spaceflight
  • The wider aeronautics world, including aviation law, economics, aerospace medicine, space, management and model making

More than 130 current journals are available with over 35,000 articles indexed on the online catalogue.

The NAL cares for the Royal Aeronautical Society (RAeS) Library and Archives. Since the Society’s foundation in 1866, the RAeS Library has incorporated many other personal and corporate collections and, in so doing, has preserved them for the nation, with their earliest book dating back to 1515.

Special collections include: balloons, airships, air charts, aircraft models and aviation philately. Archives include the records of the Royal Aeronautical Society and the Society of Society of British Aircraft Constructors and the personal collections of Sir George Cayley, C. G. Grey and the design drawings of F.S. Barnwell.

Photographs and images include: over 100,000 photographs, lithographs and other images. There are over 40,000 technical reports from around the world, including those published by the Royal Aircraft Establishment (RAE), NASA and ARC. Also, material on aircraft production including company and staff journals and company brochures.

To browse, or limit your search to the National Aerospace Library, go to the main tab on copac.jisc.ac.uk and choose ‘National Aerospace Library’ from the list of libraries.